Date: Fri Dec 20, 2002 11:06 am
Subject: Fw: Links: Embroidery in it's myriad forms


> Greetings everyone. This week's links list is dedicated to embroidery in
> many forms, including the Bayeaux tapestry. Alas, that great shockwave
> Bayeaux site is now gone from the net, but there are other sites dedicated
> to it, so please do not despair! In addition there are other embroidery
> > sites, and if the particular ethnic embroidery you want to see is not
> listed
> > below, it is sure to be listed at one of the sites.
> >
> > As always feel free to pass this along wherever it will find an interested
> > and ready audience, and feel free to use these links to update your own
> > links pages, should you wish to do so.
> >
> > Cheers
> >
> > Aoife
> >
> > Medieval/Renaissance Embroidery Page
> > http://www.advancenet.net/~jscole/medembro.html
> > A nice, long-time website with information and links regarding various
> types
> > of medieval embroidery.
> >
> > A Stitch out of time, Medieval embroidery for the modern era
> > http://home.flash.net/~wymarc/
> > A site of links, gif's and patterns. A must-see for those who are serious
> > about counted thread work.
> >
> > Clare's Medieval Embroidery Webpage
> > http://www.planetc.com/users/derwyddon/embroider.html
> > Mainly Assisi/Voided work.  Includes class handouts, gif's, primary source
> > pointers, etc...(Site Excerpt) The term Assisi work is somewhat misleading
> > because voided embroideries are characteristic of other nations besides
> > Italy.  The term "Assisi work" began to be used during the Revivalist
> > Movement of the 19th century.  It would be more accurate to refer to the
> > style as Voided Work.
> >
> > The Bayeaux Tapestry Finale
> > http://www.madeira.co.uk/bayeux.html
> > This is a good site to get the essence of this massive embroidery. The
> site
> > scans left and right on the final section of the tapestry, and you can
> pause
> > it at will to examine details. (Site Excerpt) To embroiderers, the Bayeaux
> > Tapestry is so familiar that we tend to believe there is little we don't
> > know about it: King Edward the Confessor's so-called promise: Earl
> Harold's
> > forced oath to William: William's revenge in 1066. Wool embroidered on
> > linen. The scale of the thing. Astonishing, we say. Yet I have been
> > surprised by the number of embroiderers who were not aware that the 230
> ft.
> > long wall-hanging suffered so much ill-treatment since its advent that the
> > final episode(s) was completely torn off and has never been found.
> >
> > Bayeaux Tapestry Information page
> > http://www.battle1066.com/bayeux2.shtml
> > (Site Excerpt) Before we begin it should be understood that it is not a
> > Tapestry in the full sense of the word. It is an embroidery. It was
> > constructed from eight separate pieces of linen which were joined to make
> up
> > its length. It is approximately 70 metres long and half a metre wide. It
> is
> > evident that at one stage it was even longer, probably by as much as seven
> > or eight metres are missing. This is a tragedy as it may have answered
> many
> > of the questions that give cause for debate today. More will be said about
> > this later.
> >
> > The Invasion of England (Illustrated with the Bayeaux Tapestry)
> > http://www.ibiscom.com/bayeux.htm
> >
> > Medieval Embroidery, some charted examples, by Joyce Miller
> > http://www.drbeer.com/joyce/emb/embroid.htm
> > See examples: Almoner's pouch, Altar hanging (Icelandic), Embroidered
> > cushion and embroidered box.(Site Excerpt ) The embroideries charted here
> > reflect my interest in counted thread embroidery of the medieval period,
> as
> > opposed to free embroidery or blackwork. I especially lean towards early
> > stuff, particularly the bold colors and geometric patterns of German and
> > Scandinavian embroidery. With the advent of the Web, I can now make these
> > charts available to all, rather than have them mouldering in folders in my
> > attic.
> >
> > Lothene Experimental Archaeology Embroidery Page (a re-enactment village)
> > http://www.lothene.demon.co.uk/crafts2.html
> > Especially valuable for the close-up photography of stitching examples.
> > (Site Excerpt) Thread had to be spun and dyed by hand, so it was
> relatively
> > expensive. The embroidery stitch shown opposite, called "laid and couched"
> > is designed to keep almost all the thread on the front surface of the
> > design, so as to reduce wastage.
> >
> > Regia Anglorum Anglo-Saxon Embroidery Techniques
> > http://www.regia.org/embroid.htm
> > Includes photos of works executed in t he appropriate period styles. (Site
> > Excerpt) Your first problem will probably be finding a suitable design
> > especially for Saxon costume.
> > There are a wealth of ideas on stone carving, jewellery and other metal
> work
> > for the Celts and Vikings, but stone carvings, manuscript borders and
> > illustration seem to be the main source for the Saxon designs.
> >
> > Developing Your Own Pattern Book
> > by Maistreas Sîban nî Sheaghdha, OL
> > http://members.aol.com/tbyrnes883/armonye/patterns.html
> > (Site Excerpt) In the twentieth century, most craft stores can accommodate
> > the modern embroider easily. Though pattern books were published in the
> > Middle Ages, it is unlikely that you will find them sitting on the craft
> > shelves. Therefore, we must seek out, define, and develop our own pattern
> > books.As you begin your search, you will soon discover that your resources
> > have simplified the period by breaking them into three categories: Early,
> > Middle, and Late. Some resources may vary as much as 50 years so there are
> > no hard and fast rules concerning the break point.
> >
> > Atlantia MOAS archive of Embroidery links
> > http://moas.atlantia.sca.org/topics/embr.htm
> > Note that though this is a gold mine of information, many of the links are
> > now obsolete.
> >
> > Metal Thread and Purl Embroidery
> > http://www.kipar.org/costumes_embroidery_metal.html
> > A comprehensive technique site with photos of the work and diagrams.
> >
> > Viking Embroidery Stitches and Motifs
> > http://www.cs.vassar.edu/~capriest/vikembroid.html
> > (Site Excerpt) Embroidery as we in the SCA understand it wasn't really
> > adopted by the Vikings until the first half of the ninth century. At that
> > point the pervasive influence of the foreign cultures with which the
> Vikings
> > intermingled so freely began to assert itself in both technological and
> > art-historical ways. In textile and clothing ornamentation, the Vikings
> > began half-heartedly to imitate their neighbors at that time. Two
> > distinctive embroidery styles emerged, a style influenced by the lands to
> > the west (represented mostly by finds at Bjerringhøj and Jorvík) and a
> style
> > influenced by the lands to the east (represented by finds at Birka and
> > Valsgärde).
> >
> > Ladies Solar ( a list of links to Medieval and Renaissance embroidery)
> > http://www.applink.net/wolfpack/solar.html
> >
> > Kiara's Historical Embroidery Page
> > http://www.angelfire.com/zine/kiarapanther/embroidery/emb.html
> > (Site Excerpt) I not only love embroidery, I love to research. My main
> focus
> > at the moment is 16th and 17th century embroidery forms, because there are
> > so many surviving examples. I am also very interested in Medieval
> > embroidery.
> >
> > Embroidery, An ongoing site with articles and links on embroidery as it
> > applies to the Middle Ages and the SCA.
> > http://www2.kumc.edu/itc/staff/rknight/Embroid.htm
> >
> > A Dictionary of Embroidery and Sewing Stitches
> > http://www.anu.edu.au/ITA/CSA/textiles/sharonb/stitches/stitchfsite.html
> > (Site Excerpt) To assist those who are new to the craft of embroidery I
> have
> > categorized each stitch as to its degree of difficulty. A single pair of
> > scissors indicates that the stitch is easy to work and you should not
> > hesitate to try it. If you see two scissors, the stitch requires more
> skill.
> > Three scissors indicate that the stitch needs skill and practice
> >
> > Elizabethan Embroidery Resources
> > http://costume.dm.net/black-bib.html
> > (Site Excerpt) The resources below are divided into three sections:
> General
> > Embroidery Resources, which contains books about all aspects of
> > historical/Elizabethan embroidery, Blackwork Embroidery Resources, books
> > specifically about the blackwork embroidery technique so popular during
> the
> > 16th century, and Online Resources, a listing of websites about 16th
> century
> > embroidery.
> >
> > 14th and 15th century German Counted Thread Embroidery
> > http://www.advancenet.net/~jscole/wymarc.html
> > Many gif's of counted thread patterns based on historical evidence.
> >
> > Elizabethan Blackwork Embroidery Archives
> > http://www.blackworkarchives.com/
> >
> > Skinner Sisters (authentic patterns from historical examples)
> > http://www.skinnersisters.com/
> > (Site excerpt) We are happy to furnish free charts and other benefits to
> > guilds upon receipt of a request from a program chair or newsletter
> editor.
> >
> > SCA Arts Embroidery webpage (links)
> > http://www.stopcrime.net/scaarts/embroidery.html
> >
> >
> > The greatest good you can do for another is not just share your riches,
> but
> > to reveal to him, his own.---Benjamin Disraeli
> >
> >
>
>
>
>
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>
>


-- 
Jadwiga Zajaczkowa, mka Jennifer Heise          jenne@mail.browser.net
"I postpone death by living, by suffering, by error, by risking, by
giving, by losing." -- Anais Nin

-- 
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\ \ Lehigh Library & Technology Services, Phone: (610) 758-3072
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